The development of any windfarm proposal is a lengthy process which involves a number of formal and informal stages – designed to give a wide range of stakeholders the opportunity to understand what is being proposed and to give people the chance to make their views known.

Because this development is greater than 50 MW, the proposal will be decided at a national level by Scottish Ministers under the Electricity Act (known as a s36 application).

The proposal is still at an early stage, but should it progress, the scheme would be capable of generating up to 151 MW of electricity and would create significant community benefit as well as 100-150 construction jobs over a four-year period with five to six full time equivalent operational jobs on completion. The project would also see the creation of landscape-scale habitat management plans in addition to the wind farm development.

This scoping report is a formal stage within the planning process and will deliver detailed guidance on what the scope of the scheme’s Environmental impact Assessment (EIA) should be.

Discussions have taken place with the local community, local landowners, Dumfries and Galloway Council, Scottish Natural Heritage and the Scottish Government.

NLEI has indicatedthat it will offer full community benefit and the opportunity to participate in shared ownership of the scheme in line with Scottish Government Good Practice Principles for Shared Ownership of Onshore Renewable Energy Developments.

Foundation Scotland – a not-for-profit organisation – has been engaged by NLEI to work with local communities to develop ideas on how community benefit could be managed.

Should it progress, the scheme would create significant community benefit as well as 100-150 construction jobs over a four-year period with five to six full time equivalent operational jobs on completion.

The project would also see the creation of landscape-scale habitat management plans in addition to the wind farm development. It is expected an application will be made in 2017.